Show 21 – IPv6 For The Win! Part 1

What You’ll Hear

This week on the Packet Pushers podcast Greg and Ethan do an IPv6 technical deep-dive with Matt Ryanczak, Network Operations Manager at ARIN (where they’ve been running IPv6 since 2003) and Jan Bervar from NIL who has done several enterprise IPv6 deployments.

This is part 1 of 2…we’ll release part 2 on the week of 10/3/2010 – watch PacketPushers.net or iTunes for the next show.

  • Let’s talk about IPv6 addressing.  Colons and letters and chazwazzas, oh my!
  • Are we supposed to use an IPv6 equivalent of RFC1918 addressing and then NAT?  What about proxies to help with the IPv4 to IPv6 transition?
  • What’s the process for getting IPv6 address space from the regional internet registries?  Or do enterprises just get IPv6 addresses from their ISPs?
  • There’s globally addressable, link-local, unique local, multicast, anycast and other types of IPv6 addresses.  What are they and how do they work?
  • Are we really, really going to have to use IPv6?  Is there *any* chance we can wish IPv6 away?
  • Did you know IPSEC and QoS were originally developed for IPv6 and back ported to IPv4?
  • How do you size enterprise IPv6 subnets?  We love our IPv4 /24s, but do /24s make sense in an IPv6 world?  Could switch silicon even handle that?
  • We discuss how network discovery works for IPv6 hosts showing up on the wire, and how frames get made.  ARP no longer exists in IPv6.  It’s all about ICMP now, my friends.
  • Did you know that while you can, you don’t *have* to use DHCP in IPv6?
  • In IPv6, the importance of IPv6’s reliance on ICMP messages needs to be considered when writing access lists.
  • ARP spoofing from far, far away becomes possible in an interesting way which we discuss.
  • How is DNS behavior different in IPv6?  Or is it?

Feedback

Follow the Packet Pushers on Twitter (@packetpushers | Greg @etherealmind | Dan @rovingengineer | Ethan @ecbanks), and send your queries & comments about the show to packetpushers@gmail.com.  We want to hear from you!

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